Recreating the throne of Egyptian Queen Hetepheres

Harvard University has created a full-scale reproduction of an ancient Egyptian throne belong to Queen Hetepheres. The materials are based on the original: cedar, blue faience tiles, gold foil, gesso, cordage seating and copper. It is the centrepiece of the new exhibition:  Recreating the Throne of Egyptian Queen Hetepheres, which will run indefinitely.

The Harvard University-Boston Museum of Fine Arts Expedition discovered a small and unfinished chamber in 1925 in Giza. It contained deteriorated burial equipment, a sarcophagus and several other objects belong to Queen Hetepheres, the mother of King Khufu. Back in the 1930s some of the furniture was reconstructed but the elaborate chair wasn’t reconstructed until now.

A 3D digital model of the tomb and its contents was created and a computer-controlled five-axis milling machine and human labour created the chair.

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About Moniek 868 Articles
My name is Moniek and I am from the Netherlands. I began this website in 2013 because I wanted to share these women's amazing stories.

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